Tag Archives: truth

Sweet and Bitter Truths

scrollIn a recent article in Christianity Today, Lisa Fields, an expert on biblical literacy, said: “When it relates to biblical literacy, I always think of Ezekiel, when God commands him to eat the whole scroll, and it will be sweet and then bitter. It just reminds me that in Scripture there will be some bitter portions and some sweet portions. There are some difficult things I have to wrestle with, but because I believe God has called me to this work, I have to take all of it” (“Black Bible Reading Endures,” Christianity Today, January/February 2019, 17).

It is true that the Bible does not sugar-coat the fact that the wages of sin is death and that there will be suffering in this world. It does not hide the fact that people turned against God, that there was betrayal and hardship among God’s people that still happen today. We cannot change the fact that there is sin in the world and that there will bad days sometimes as we wait for the Last Day to come.

But the sweet news comes from St. Peter who tells us, “Rejoice inasmuch as you participate in the sufferings of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when his glory is revealed.” (1 Peter 4:13). The sweetness is revealed in Revelation 21:3-5 in John’s vision of heaven:

“And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, ‘Look! God’s dwelling place is now among the people, and he will dwell with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God. He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.’ He who was seated on the throne said, ‘I am making everything new!’ Then he said, ‘Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.’”

In the end in the bliss of heaven the bitterness will be no more and we will only taste the sweetness of salvation won for us in Jesus.

Let the first thing we do each day until that time always be to “taste and see that the Lord is good” (Psalm 34:8). That sweetness of the goodness of the Lord supersedes all bitterness.

Mercy and Truth

I recently heard the choral piece “Mercy and Truth,” written by composer Philip Lawson, commissioned for the Salisbury Cathedral in England. Based on Psalm 85:10, it overlays the words of the text in unique ways for moving effects.

The text is: “Mercy and truth are met together. Righteousness and peace have kissed each other.” Take a listen:

The song resonates because it reminds me that the mercy of God is always in line with ultimate truth. We can never hide the truth from God, but the truth does not take away the mercy of God. He always loves us and forgives us, even when he knows the truth of our sin and knows that we have failed him time and again. He is faithful and will always return to find us when we have strayed to bring us back to him.

The first couplet Psalm 85:10in this verse (mercy and truth) is tied with the second paring of righteousness and peace, which kiss each other. I find this connection interesting as well because it acknowledges that when we are found righteous in the sight of God through Jesus, we find peace. And this connection is not cold or indifferent. It elicits an outpouring of love and compassion. There is a bond of love that happens through a kiss, and knowing that righteousness and peace kiss each other means that those who find righteousness and peace together have a loving and holy bond. We and God are reconnected through his love found in Christ.

What I like most about this song is how the words are sung on top of each other by different sections of the choir. One part starts immediately when one is done with the couplets and some parts come in while others are halfway through. Isn’t that just like life and how things get jumbled up and mixed together and we are not sure when one thing begins and one thing ends? While it sometimes may seem confusing, the reality is that God is in control and his mercy and his truth, his righteousness and peace will always be a part of our lives as his followers.

Are We Suffering from Chronological Snobbery?

chronological snobberyIn discussing religious perspectives of his day, C. S. Lewis’ friend Owen Barfield referred to the peril of “chronological snobbery,” the assumption that the present age is to be held superior to the past merely because it came later—that history is a record of uninterrupted progress (“The Well-Read Christian,” Modern Reformation, 55).

This assumption might seem laughable at first glance, but upon further reflection I found myself susceptible to it myself. Without even realizing, we tend to assume that we know better than those of the past when it comes to many things, not just religious things. But that, of course, is not always the case.

That is why we often need to reorient and recalibrate ourselves to what is known to be true and right and solid theology. To combat chronological snobbery in ourselves theologically, author Rick Ritchie suggests, “Aside from a rereading of the new Testament, a reading of old Christian authors is probably the best way of challenging our own complacency with our understanding of the good Christian life” (“The Well-Read Christian,” Modern Reformation, 55). Ritchie recommends we turn to the writings of C. S. Lewis, G. K. Chesterton and John Warwick Montgomery for trustworthy insights into our faith that have stood the test of time.

Above all, of course, it is the Word of God that must guide our faith no matter what age we find ourselves in and no matter what “in vogue” teaching may be popular. We must hold all current messages regarding religion up against what we know to be true from Scripture. For we know that “All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Timothy 3:16-17).

So don’t become a “chronological snob,” and think that somehow we know better than God’s Word simply because we are living in “modern times.” As one of my favorite songs, “Ancient Words,” says:

Holy words long preserved
For our walk in this world,
They resound with God’s own heart.
Oh, let the ancient words impart.

So let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you remember that the biblical truth that Jesus took our place on the cross for our forgiveness and salvation will never change or fade away or be replaced throughout the passage of time.

 

Pluralism and the Church

The WayWe live in an increasingly pluralistic society. Pluralism is the philosophy that holds that no single explanation or view of reality can account for all the phenomena of life. As a result, most issues are considered “neutral” (neither right nor wrong) and can be determined by the individual as he or she sees fit.

The problem for the Christian Church because of pluralism is that the Christian Church becomes only one of many possibilities for how to look at the world, and, therefore, any standard of truth or conduct is diminished or often even disregarded.

Pluralism leads to a kind of chaos of thought in which nothing is agreed upon and there are no set rules for anything. It’s about your truth and my truth and their truth and all are considered okay in this framework.

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