Tag Archives: Jesus

Love One Another

reaching out

On the night that Jesus was betrayed, knowing what laid ahead for him, he gave a new commandment: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another (John 13:34). Jesus is talking here about no ordinary love. He is talking about a love that is grounded in what he was about to do on the cross. It is a love that is selfless, sacrificial, deep, complete and life-saving. Loving others as Jesus has loved us is not something that comes naturally to us as humans at first. We as humans at first want to love others only to please ourselves and satisfy our own needs and desires. But Jesus shows us a love that puts the other first and ourselves last. We find in Jesus a way of love that reaches outward and does not expect anything in return.

In Scripture we read, “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). We were enemies of God when Christ died for us. We did not deserve his love, yet he loved us by giving his all for us. Jesus tells us elsewhere in Scripture: Love your enemies. Pray for those who persecute you (Matthew 5:44). That is the Jesus kind of love we are expected to exhibit in our lives. It is a love that goes against conventional wisdom. Yet it is a love that we have experienced and a love that we (and Christ) want others to experience through us.

In these contentious times when people seem to be on opposite ends of the spectrum in nearly every aspect of society, it is time for us to let the love of Christ enter into the picture. Let us show compassion in a Christlike way to those who differ in their opinions than us. Let us show care as Jesus would to those who are against us in any way. For Jesus died for all and his love for all knows no bounds. Our love should be just as boundless.

Running on Empty

empty

I often see how far my car can go when it is on E. Not too smart, I know. I eventually succumb to reason and fill my tank to full. How often do we do the same thing when it comes to our energy level. Especially during these trying times, we can find ourselves at the end of the day running on empty, so to speak, after serving as teacher, parent, worker, boss, cook, family shopper, etc.

Our God does not want us running on empty. He wants us to fill ourselves up with the power of the Holy Spirit. He wants us to recharge our batteries, if you will, with the strength only he can provide.

Jesus himself took the time to be filled up with power and strength from above after long and hard days of serving people and spreading the Gospel. In Luke 5:16, we read that Jesus “would withdraw to desolate places and pray.” What are the places you go to to get away from it all and be renewed and restored in the Lord? Maybe it is during prayer at the end of the day. Maybe it is while you are on a long walk after dinner. Maybe it is reading Scripture in the early morning. Whatever it is that brings you fullness in your spiritual life, keep doing it and take advantage of the opportunities that present themselves to be with the Lord. In Galatians 6:9, we read, “Let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up.” These times of renewal and restoration keep the weariness at bay. So keep your energy up and your tank full and God will continue to do great things through you.

Renewal

manger and tomb

Thank you, loving Father, for restoring our joy in you through the birth of your Son, Jesus. May his presence among us resurrect in us a new sense of peace and liveliness in living our lives refreshed by our Savior’s forgiveness and renewal. Amen.

The prayer above is something that I wrote recently for an Advent 2020 product, but was ultimately not used. So let’s enjoy a little Christmas in August by giving this prayer some thought.

For me, it’s nice to remember during any time of year that Jesus brings renewal and restoration. There is always a chance to start over again with Jesus. He is reborn in us each and every day. and any time we feel down and out, Jesus can lift us up and into his arms.

The concept of resurrection is a reminder that with Jesus alive in us, we have nothing to fear and we should be at peace. Living in him should be lively and active, something that moves us forward in our faith.

From manger to empty grave, our Jesus has moved forward for us. It’s our turn now to move forward for him with acts of forgiveness, love and service.

Biking

bike

I have been biking the last few Saturdays on a trail near my house. The trail had been closed for a time in the midst of the COVID shutdown, so I was excited to get back on it after some time away.

I learned a few things “getting back into the saddle.” The first thing is that you cannot get right back to where you once were. You have to ease your way in. I found that I was not going as fast as I was and that it took more energy. When I got home, I felt soreness in my shoulders and back.

The other thing I learned is that it is not best to bike in the baking sun of midday. The sweat was pouring down my face and all down my back in the 90-degree heat. On weeks when I rode a little later in the day, the sun was not as sweltering and there was a breeze along the way.

Lastly, I discovered that even the slightest incline can make a bike ride more difficult. I didn’t even realize I was going uphill until my body started objecting with aches and pains. Turning around and going downhill feels like a dream after that.

These experiences mirror the Christian life in that it sometimes takes time to get it right, to hit our stride as Christ’s disciples. We need to be patient with ourselves and not get discouraged when we don’t follow Christ the way we should or we miss opportunities to witness. More chances will come along. The path is long and God will never give up on us, so we should not give up on ourselves.

Life as a Christian can get uncomfortable sometimes. But don’t let the heat of hard times get to you. You can find ways to get around the heat and keep moving forward for the Lord and his plan for your life journey.

Uphill battles in our Christian way can startle us but when we keep pedaling through, we know that the downward slope is on the horizon with an easy ride toward heaven because Christ went up the hill of Calvary and came down victorious over sin and death forever through his death and resurrection.

Whether you bike or not, keep on going forward in the name of the Lord. As the Scripture says, “Let us run (bike) with perseverance the race that is set before us,  looking to Jesus the pioneer and perfecter of our faith, who for the sake of the joy that was set before him endured the cross, disregarding its shame, and has taken his seat at the right hand of the throne of God” (Hebrews 12:2).

Now I See

reading glasses

It seems that no matter who you are and no matter what your eyesight has been in the past, once you reach or near a certain age you will need glasses. I have worn glasses nearly my entire life, but when I was getting into middle age, I discovered I needed new glasses and different glasses for various tasks.

This change in my eyesight needs reminded me of the following words from Scripture: “One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see” (John 9:25). This was said by the blind man who was healed by Jesus. He could not see, but now he could because of Jesus.

We have blindspots in our lives that change with age and that Jesus helps us to see. Like a new pair of glasses, Jesus helps us to see better the needs of older adults that we once were blind to when we were younger. He opens our eyes to opportunities to serve that we once did not see at all. Once blind to God at work in the world, we now see his hand reaching out to make things happen to his glory, through the lens of Jesus Christ.

No matter what your age or eyesight situation, let Jesus give you the vision to see what he can do through you.

Parade of Praise

birthday parade

We have been experiencing something we never would have heard of last year at this time: the birthday parade. People drive by the birthday celebrant’s house in a string of cars, honking, shouting, waving and holding up signs. The birthday celebrant feels the love without being physically touched and the whole neighborhood gets to know that it is someone’s special day.

The concept of a parade of praise for someone reminds me of what happened to Jesus when he entered Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. People stood at a distance and shouted, “Hosanna and hooray,” words of praise to Jesus, as he rode slowly by in the most basic mode of transport of the time: a donkey. Instead of waving signs, the people waved palm branches to the man of the hour. A palm branch sent the message: “You are a king, Jesus. You are our king.” When people put their cloaks on the ground, in front of Jesus, it was like writing in chalk on the sidewalks as people have been doing the last few months: “We are with you. We are in this together.”

The parade of Palm Sunday provides us with a template for how we should welcome our Lord Jesus into our midst during these trying times. We should rejoice in him. We should let our community know how special he is to us. We should make ourselves visible and present to him. With a cross, a sign or maybe a decorative flag waving in the wind, our homes should declare to anyone driving by: Jesus lives here and he is reborn in us every day. Alleluia and amen!

A Boat in the Storm

When the disciples were with Jesus on the boat and a storm blew in, the disciples turned immediately to Jesus. But Jesus was asleep. “Save us,” they pleaded. But Jesus calmly said, “O you of little faith,” and quietly said to the wind and the waves and the rain, “Be still.” And immediately they were still and the disciples were astonished: “Who is this man that even the wind and the sea obey them him?”

This story is very much like our lives. We are very much at peace in the boat of our lives with Jesus asleep inside. Then when a storm comes along and rocks the boat of our lives, we panic and we rouse Jesus from slumber, begging him to save us. Jesus, without much fanfare, stills the storm in our lives and renews faith in us. Peace returns to our hearts and Jesus remains to dwell by our sides.

The boat of our lives continues to sail until it reaches the shore of heaven, where we will dwell in perfect harmony in blessed union with Christ and our fellow lifemates giving praise to our God who welcomes us to the eternal banks of glory in paradise.

The storms that come along can be all sorts of things. They can be physical upheavals like sickness and disease, chronic illness or pain. They can be earthly like rainstorms, hurricanes, floods, fires, tornadoes or other disasters. They can be spiritual turmoil like lack of faith and trust., a loss of reliance on prayer and devotions and a turning away from Scripture for help and strength.

When Jesus tells the wind and waves, “Be still,” he is telling us too, to be still. We are not to get anxious or panic when things start going wrong. The arrival of trouble means that we need to look to God and know that he is who he says he is. “Be still and know that he is God,” Psalm 46:10 says. In our stillness, we know and remember that God is trustworthy, faithful, strong, confident, courageous, comforting, loving, peaceful and caring. These attributes will never change, though the world continues to change all around us. The trouble and turmoil of this world obey the voice of the Lord. We should never think that trouble and turmoil can overcome the power of God in our lives.

When we think of Jesus sleeping in the boat during the storm, we often think he is not caring or paying attention to our troubles and turmoil. But the truth is that he is asleep because he is not worried about the trouble and turmoil. He is taking care of them.

One Thing Needful

Mary and Martha of Bethany were good friends of Jesus. They were such good friends of his that they had him over for dinner one night. Think of how many people may have wanted to have Jesus over for dinner at the time, but Jesus chose to spend a meal with Mary and Martha. Think, too, of the meals you have shared with friends. Think of the good times, the laughter, the banter, the witty conversations, the good food. That’s what Mary and Martha were looking forward to in their time with Jesus.

But think too of how nervous you might be if you knew Jesus was coming over for dinner at your house. You would want everything just right and you would want to make sure the house was clean and the meal was cooked to perfection. This is more what Martha was going through in her preparations for Jesus’ arrival. Jesus noticed that this was how Martha was approaching things. “Martha, Martha, you are worried and nervous about many things,” Jesus said. Jesus was scolding Martha. And he is scolding us in the process. He does not want us to be worried and nervous about anything, let alone many things. The truth, though, is that we in our sinful human condition are worriers by nature and nervous by default. Our task is to break out of these sinful habits and do what Christ’s disciples should do.

Mary apparently did what was desired. She sat at Jesus’ feet and listened to him. And Jesus praised her for it. He called Mary’s actions “the one thing needful.” Jesus is requesting of us that these be our actions as well.  How do we sit at Jesus’ feet and listen to him? We come to him humbly and lowly, and we honor him. That is mirroring the posture of sitting at Jesus’ feet. Reading the Bible and engaging in prayer are ways to listen to Jesus.

Mary is a model for us of how to greet Jesus in our own homes. She is happy that he is with her, just as we should be. Jesus truly is with us in our homes each day and he dines with us at every meal. When we open the pages of the Bible, it is as if we are opening the doors of our home to Jesus. And when we fold our hands in prayer before each meal, it is as if we are pulling up a chair at our tables for him. His presence with us in our homes is a blessing we should never take for granted, but should be excited about. All that we do in our homes should be a gift for the Guest in our home, our good friend, Jesus.

10 Lepers

There were 10 men with leprosy who met Jesus on the road, begging for mercy that they might be healed. How bold it was to plead for mercy from Jesus. It shows that they trusted and believed that Jesus could heal them. It also shows courage and strength on Jesus’ part that he was willing to draw close enough to the 10 lepers to hear them and listen to them. It was customary at the time not to interact with lepers and not to get too close to them, lest you become infected. If we are sick and in need of help and healing, we should not be too proud or afraid to ask Jesus for assistance. We should not hold back from requesting his mercy toward us. We should seek help and healing from him alone. Whenever we are sick and in need, our first response should be to go to Jesus. Nothing else gives us the help and healing we need, no matter how frightened we may be.

Jesus’ instructions to the men is for them to go and show themselves to the priests. The men did as they were told. On their way they were made clean again. Jesus had healed the men. There was excitement and joy. We can image the men cheering and celebrating and running to their homes to enjoy what had happened to them with their relatives and friends. But the actions of one man was to return to Jesus and give him thanks for the miracle of healing he had been blessed with through Christ.

To the shock of everyone, this man was a Samaritan, not of the people of Israel. The Samaritan knew what it felt like to be ostracized and how special it was to be recognized and healed by Jesus since he was an outsider. This Samaritan bowed before Jesus, showing his humility. He did not deserve this goodness toward him from Jesus, he knew. We, too, should show humility and thanksgiving for the great goodness shown to us in Christ’s help and healing of our illnesses and of our sinful condition.

After the Samaritan bowed before Jesus, Jesus asked, “Is the only one to return to give thanks this foreigner?” Jesus acknowledges that this is unusual. How sad and unfortunate for those who did not return to give thanks and receive blessing from Christ. How joyful and fortunate for the Samaritan to return to give thanks and receive blessing from Jesus. Jesus told the Samaritan man, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Jesus made it clear that healing from him gives us the energy to move forward in our work with him. Having faith and trust in him is what motivates us to act. Faith in action would have been a new way of approaching life for the Samaritan man. Instead of pulling away from others because of his disease, he would now be drawing close to others to care for them and love them as Jesus did for him. Instead of living in fear for his life on the outskirts of town, the man would be living in confidence and strength, knowing that Jesus had healed him. For those who did not turn to give thanks, their lives lacked faith. Their healing is not attached to Christ by not returning to give thanks. The joy of new lives is not accompanied by thanksgiving to Jesus and thus is not as fully experienced by the nine that are healed but did not return to Jesus.

The Faith of the Centurion

faith

When Jesus encountered the centurion, it was the centurion who knew what Jesus could do for him. He asked for healing for his sick servant. The centurion understood what it meant to be leader over others. “I say ‘Go’ and they go. I say ‘Come’ and they come.” He knew the power a leader had and obedience a servant under his command had. We learn that Jesus is our supreme leader and we are his servants. It is our duty to obey him. The centurion showed obedience to the Lord, through his words and actions, and the Lord healed the centurion’s servant. The Lord even said, “Not in all of Israel have I found such faith.” This was a shocking statement because the centurion was not a member of the tribes of Israel, God’s people. The centurion was a Roman, an enemy of the people of God. The Romans were rulers over the Israelites. Israel was an occupied nation. What is interesting is that we live as foreigners in a foreign land. We are not citizens of the earth, but citizens of God’s kingdom. What this reminds us of is that followers of Christ are present in the kingdom of God. But there are those like the centurion who honor and respect the Savior and trust his judgment even though he is part of a group that does not believe in him.